Comparison of the NEC4 ECSC with the NEC4 ECC

Comparison of the NEC4 ECSC with the NEC4 ECC

The Engineering and Construction Contract (ECC) and the Engineering and Construction Short Contract (ECSC) have been around for many years, as have the subcontract versions (ECS and ECSS). The ECSC is a simplified and shortened version of the ECC, including procedures which are simpler to manage and appropriate for priced contracts of low risk and low complexity.

However, often Clients and Contractors often get used to the ECC and the ECS and do not consider the shorter versions even if they might be more appropriate for the contract in question.

In the case of the short contract there are a few things in it that do not directly pass on the risks in the way the ECC does (e.g. the weather compensation event is different and Client liabilities are compensation events in the ECC but not in the ECSC). However, for many relatively straight forward contracts, the ECSC or ECSS will be the better option.

The new guidance note provides a comprehensive breakdown of the differences between the ECC and ECSC. Developed by Richard Patterson, NEC and Procurement Specialist, Mott MacDonald, with assistance from the NEC Contract Board, the document expands upon existing Mott MacDonald literature and NEC is pleased to be making it more widely available.

Download the Guidance Note
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